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What are the best security & privacy features in Windows 11?

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Vlad Turiceanu

by Vlad Turiceanu

Editor-in-Chief




Passionate about technology, Windows, and everything that has a power button, he spent most of his time developing new skills and learning more about the tech world. Coming from a solid background in PC… Read more






  • Microsoft’s Dave Weston states that security was the number one reason for companies that upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 7.

  • The Redmond tech company urges companies to get rid of passwords completely and move on to a zero-trust framework.

  • Continuously working on it, Microsoft made great progress on the Windows Hello biometrics, for accessing Azure Active Directory networks.

  • Also, a future alternative for TPM would be Pluton, which is a Microsoft-designed and updated component of CPU hardware, from Intel, AMD, and Qualcomm.


Windows 11 security


There has been a lot of talk about the changes that Windows 11 brings to the table for its vast universe of users.


With every OS upgrade, Microsoft keeps improving particular features, every time focusing more on some of the most important ones.


The director of enterprise and operating system security at Microsoft, Dave Weston, states that security represented the number one factor for companies that upgraded to Windows 10 from Windows 7.


As you can imagine, since then, after all the high-profile hacking incidents and the constant rise of ransomware, security is even higher on everyone’s agenda.


WIndows 11’s top selling point will be improved security


The above-mentioned Microsoft official states that he’s very confident that the added security of Windows 11 will drive a much faster uptake. 


In fact, people at Microsoft keep saying that the two paramount decisions that enterprises can take in order to improve security are to get rid of passwords completely and move on to a zero-trust framework.



I expect the adoption to go even faster than the Windows 7 to 10 period because of the security advantages.



This means transitioning to a network security design that will assume breaches, and also acknowledges that managed, as well as unmanaged devices flow between homes and workplaces fluidly.


This is mainly because of the new work conditions brought by the COVID-19 pandemic.    


It is well known that Microsoft kept stressing passwordless authentication for years now, as sort of an early replacement for the FIDO2 standard.


Microsoft has already made significant progress in this area, with its Windows Hello biometrics, for accessing Azure Active Directory networks, and apps that support the Microsoft Authenticator app and FIDO2-based security keys, similar to Google’s Titan keys.


Another reason why Windows 11 will tighten up operating system security is that more of these security features for the enterprise are turned on by default. 



We got deep in the engine, tweaked things, tuned things, got things fast enough and compatible enough that they’re just there. It’s not the features that are there – it’s the features that are turned on by default



New era, new threats, new security meajures


What the Redmond tech company does now, means that virtualization-based security, and Trusted Platform Module hardware-based security, as well as BitLocker, are automatically turned on for all Windows 11 devices. 


You should also know that Microsoft bolstered the security of biometrics in Windows 11, securing all the biometric data in their own protected virtual machine.


This will come in handy while trying to stop attackers from stealing biometric data when assaulting systems that rely on biometric authentication. 


The infamous TPM chip will be either integrated into the PC’s motherboard or added separately into the CPU with the purpose of protecting encryption keys, user credentials, and other sensitive data.


As you have probably read in our dedicated article on system requirements, all certified Windows 11 systems must have a TPM 2.0 chip.





Another example would be Pluton, which is a Microsoft-designed and updated component of CPU hardware, from Intel, AMD, and Qualcomm.


To give you a better understanding, Pluton is embedded in the CPU, so don’t mistake it for a separate processor.


One of its major benefits is that end users can just get firmware updates from Microsoft’s usual Patch Tuesday updates from Windows Update. 


Know that, at this moment, Pluton-equipped computers aren’t available, but Microsoft says that Windows 11 is ready to use it. 


All-in-all, it feels great that the company that supplies the operating system on which we perform so many of our daily actions, and on which we store so much sensitive information, is focusing on keeping us safe.


There is still much to learn about all the inner workings of Windows 11, but for the moment, the future looks interesting.


Are you happen with all the security measures that Microsoft is taking? Share your thoughts with us in the comments section below.




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